You are the owner of this business.

Blackbeard Outdoor World

Address

2678 Harmony Grove Road
Nebo, NC 28761
Last Updated: July 27, 2017

Hours

SundayClosed
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

Map

About Blackbeard Outdoor World

Blackbeard Outdoor World is locally owned and locally managed.  We can help with any of your automotive, power sports, camping and boating needs!  We carry wide inventory of parts and accessories.  There is no problem to big that our Service Department can't handle.  They can help with all your camping and boating needs.  We have the best marine technician around.

We carry New and Used RV's, Boats, Used Cars and Trucks, Golf Carts, Jet Ski's, etc.

We have no hidden fees, so you will no surprises at the time of purchase.  You will have complete understanding of the entire transaction.  You won't be disappointed in doing business with Blackbeard Outdoor World!!

Lake James Boat and R/V Storage:

  • No Doc Fees
  • No Freight Fees
  • No Prep Fees
  • Accepts:
  • American Express
  • Cash
  • Discover
  • MasterCard
  • Visa

Boating 101

Search Our Inventory Here

 

Learning to boat or sail is similar to learning to drive an automobile. Neither one happens overnight. Learning to get around on the water can be exciting, but it can also be intimidating to take over the reins of a boat for the first time.

Though beginners might be apprehensive when they first start to boat or sail, there are some tips that can make it a little easier for those new to captaining their own ship.

* Start small. Much like teenagers learning to drive are often more comfortable learning behind the wheel of a compact car, boating beginners might be more comfortable learning to sail on a small boat. Smaller boats are easier to maneuver, making even the most nervous novice a little more comfortable.

* Choose calm waters in which to practice. According to the United States Coast Guard, in 2010 there were more than 4,600 recreational boating accidents that involved 672 deaths. Though boating accidents in both the United States and Canada, where the Canadian government expected roughly 200 boaters to die on the water in 2009, have been on the decline, accident statistics illustrate just how dangerous it can be even for fully licensed and experienced sailors to operate a boat. That said, beginners should always practice in calm waters that don't boast big waves or lots of fellow boaters. This gives beginners the chance to learn the feel of the boat without the added pressure of handling choppy waters or traffic.

* Read the weather reports. Veteran boaters struggle with inclement weather from time to time, so beginners should expect to struggle with adverse conditions as well. But don't be caught off guard by bad weather. Always check the weather reports before going out, and be sure to bring along appropriate attire and gear.

* Don't go it alone. Boating and sailing come with their own terminology, which beginners are typically unfamiliar with. Before heading out on the water, learn as much of this terminology as possible, be it by studying manuals or books, or even asking experienced friends for help. When taking to the water, bring those friends along.

* Respect other boaters. Boating is a hobby enjoyed by millions, and boaters should always respect that there are other people on the water as well. Whether you're out in the middle of the ocean or relaxing at the pier on your docked boat, respect the other boaters by keeping the music down and always discarding of trash in a responsible way. Far too many boaters or boat passengers dump their garbage over the side of the boat, so always be sure you and your passengers are respectful of Mother Nature and other boaters. 

*Content by Metro Creative Connection*

When the weather starts to warm and more and more people start taking their boats out of dry dock and back to the marina, such sights can entice others to want to buy a boat. After all, the idea of sailing under the sun on the water with friends and family is something everyone can appreciate. However, sailing season might not be the ideal time to buy a boat if you're interested in getting the best deal. Actually, sailing's offseason is oftentimes the best time to buy a boat.

Many boat retailers look to liquefy their inventories in early fall. At this point you may be able to negotiate a very good deal on the previous model year since the dealerships will be making room for the next year's models. Coming equipped with a list of questions and armed with the knowledge of the average cost of the boat you want to buy can help you determine if the quoted prices are discounted. Another ideal time to go boat shopping is during the boat show season. Boat manufacturers tend to do a series of shows at convention centers across the country.

The retailers often come up with a discounted price and other incentives on the purchase of a boat because they know they'll be appealing to the thousands of people who attend the show. These prices may be even lower than the price offered for the same model just a few days later in the showroom. Even if you are not in the immediate market for a boat, attending a boat show can be a good source of information and practice for buying one down the road. It will also enable you to see a great number of different styles and manufacturers of boats all under one roof. Most of the time you are able to board the boat and look at all the features offered.

Here are some other tips when deciding whether or not to buy a boat.

  • Be sure to go out boating with friends or with a family member who owns a boat and determine whether this is really a recreational activity you want to invest in.
  • Take into consideration all of the expenses involved in boating, including insurance, trailering, docking, marina fees, fuel, safety gear, tech items, and so on. Some have said that buying a boat is like pouring money into the water. Know what you are getting into before signing on the dotted line.
  • Shop around for a good boat dealer. You want someone with whom you feel comfortable and not a dealer who is just pressuring you to buy.
  • Struggling dealerships may offer "must buy now" offers to try to get rid of boats that are not selling. Choose the boat that works for you and not the one with the smallest price tag.
  • Due to the large expense of buying a boat, many choose to go partners on the purchase. Spell out a contract that explains when and how you will have your share of the vessel before entering into a joint purchase. This way you remain friends instead of fighting over usage, cleaning and the cost of repairs. Boating can be a rewarding recreational activity. Purchase a boat after doing your research and look around for the best deal. 

*Content by Metro Creative Connection*

Camper Inventory

Search Our Inventory Here!

 

-Types of Campers:

Drivers considering buying an RV may have many questions about these increasingly popular vehicles. RVs come in two main types: motorized and towable. Understanding the differences between the two and the various subcategories of RV can help drivers make the most informed decisions when purchasing their RVs. FC15A590

Vacations are a great way to recharge and get some time away from the daily grind. While many working men and women take one or two vacations per year, recreational vehicle owners can travel more often without breaking the bank.

Recreational vehicles, or RVs, are often referred to as campers or motor homes. Equipped with many amenities, ranging from kitchens to multiple sleeping areas to entertainment spaces, RVs offer many of the comforts of home.

The Recreational Vehicle Industry Association says RV ownership is currently at an all-time high. According to Dr. Richard Curtin, RV industry analyst and director of consumer surveys at the University of Michigan, 8.9 million households now own an RV. That's up from 7.9 million in 2005.

Drivers considering buying an RV may have many questions about these increasingly popular vehicles. RVs come in two main types: motorized and towable. Understanding the differences between the two and the various subcategories of RV can help drivers make the most informed decisions when purchasing their RVs.

Motorized

Motorized RVs are broken down by class, including class A, B and C. The distinction between the classes of RV is based on size.

  • Class A: This class of motor home is very large and offers all of the comforts you'd expect from home. Many people who purchase a class A RV plan to travel all year long. Slide-outs can expand the living area when parked, and full bathrooms, complete kitchens and more are the norm. Because of their size, class A RVs tend to be the most expensive and may be more vehicle than many people can afford. Their large size (many look like a bus on the road) can make them difficult to navigate for novices.
  • Class B: Class B RVs are often referred to as "van conversions." Class B are the smallest, fully enclosed campers available in the motorized category. Living space is limited in these RVs, but economy and versatility make them quite popular. Usually these campers can sleep between two and four people.
  • Class C: Class C RVs are a compromise between types A and B. Class C are mid-sized with a driver's compartment similar to a van and a larger box in the back for the living area. Some come with a sleeping bunk above the cab. Depending on the floor plan, class C campers can sleep up to 10 people.

Towable

Towable RVs are another option and can be more affordable because they can be pulled behind your existing vehicle.

  • Travel trailers: Travel trailers look similar to traditional motorized RVs but without the driving cab. They can be hitched to the back of a vehicle. Travel trailers are popular because of their versatility. Travel trailers can be ideal for those with limited budgets but the desire to have a self-contained unit.
  • Pop-up: Folding camping trailers, or pop-up trailers, are inexpensive and lightweight. They provide many of the conveniences found in a basic travel trailer but in a smaller size.
  • Fifth-wheel: If you own a pickup truck, a fifth-wheel trailer may be good for you. These hitch to the top of the pickup bed and have similar features to a traditional travel trailer.
  • RVs make great investments for men and women who love the open road. They also are a great way to take the entire family on an affordable and memorable vacation

*Content from Metro Creative Connection*

Email Us

Case Sensitive