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Visit www.mcdowellnews.com/databases to view the accountability results for McDowell County Schools from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction.

2017-2018 School Performance Grades

Eastfield: C

East McDowell: D

Glenwood: B

Marion: C

Early College: A

McDowell High: B

Nebo: C

North Cove: B

Old Fort: B

P.G.: C

West Marion: C

West McDowell: C

AEC: Progressing

2017-2018 School Growth Status

Eastfield: Met

East McDowell: Not Met

Glenwood: Met

Marion: Met

Early College: Exceeded

McDowell High: Exceeded

Nebo: Exceeded

North Cove: Met

Old Fort: Met

P.G.: Met

West Marion: Exceeded

West McDowell: Met

4-Year Cohort Graduation Score

Early College: greater than 95 percent

McDowell High: 87.6 percent

2017-2018 Reading Letter Grades and Growth Status

Eastfield: C, Met

East McDowell: D, Not Met

Glenwood: C, Met

Marion: C, Met

Nebo: C, Exceeded

North Cove: C, Met

Old Fort: C, Met

P.G.: C, Met

West Marion: C, Met

West McDowell: C, Not Met

Math Letter Grades and Growth Status

Eastfield: C, Met

East McDowell: D, Met

Glenwood: B, Exceeded

Marion: C, Met

Nebo: C, Met

North Cove: B, Met

Old Fort: B, Met

P.G.: C, Met

West Marion: C, Exceeded

West McDowell: C, Exceeded

More than a third of North Carolina’s 2,537 public schools earned As and Bs for 2017-18 under the state’s annual School Performance Grade accountability measurement, with nearly three quarters meeting or exceeding expectations for academic progress. About 22 percent of the schools received a grade of D or F.

Accountability results were released Wednesday to the State Board of Education along with the four-year Cohort Graduation Rate for the class of 2018. The four-year rate, tracking students who entered 9th grade in 2014, shows that 86.3 percent of the cohort graduated last school year.

For McDowell, most schools maintained their scores from the previous school year with McDowell Early College standing out with an A.

2017-2018 School Performance Grades:

Eastfield: C

East McDowell: D

Glenwood: B

Marion: C

Early College: A

McDowell High: B

Nebo: C

North Cove: B

Old Fort: B

P.G.: C

West Marion: C

West McDowell: C

AEC: Progressing

“McDowell Early College is an A school this year,” said Superintendent of McDowell County Schools Mark Garrett. “Comparing this year to last year, when we look at everything overall, we are up four or five points as a district. We have plenty of digging that we have to do. We saw increases across the board unilaterally. We have some challenges in our middle schools. East McDowell took a little bit of a tumble, but in 16-17 we had two schools that didn’t make growth, this year we only had one that didn’t make growth. One of the more impressive things a few years ago McDowell High School was way in the negative for growth, and this year almost eight points positive in growth, so that is good progress we continue to see there.”

Eastfield, Glenwood, Marion, Nebo, North Cove, Old Fort, P.G., West Marion and West McDowell made C’s in reading and either met or exceeded growth status. East McDowell received a D and did not meet growth.

“I’m really pleased with the progress, but we always want to see more. We have a couple of schools that are much closer to B’s than they were. Nebo came off the D list and grew 14 points, and they had a great year,” said Garrett.

By the performance of individual grades statewide, middle school students in 2017-18 generally gained in both reading and math, particularly seventh and eighth graders, while the performance of students in elementary grades was more mixed. Third graders saw an improvement on math exams, with higher percentages of students meeting the CCR and GLP standards, but their performance on reading exams was down on both standards from the previous year: 45 percent met the CCR standard, compared to 46.1 percent in 2016-17; 55.9 percent met the GLP standard, compared to 57.8 percent in 2016-17.

“Our elementary schools have continued to solidify their foundations and build on that. Math is still the thing we are working to get a better handle on statewide, not just here. Graduation rates held steady for the system. We were 85.2 for 17-18 for all three high schools,” said Garrett.

State Superintendent Mark Johnson said that while last year was something of a reset year for measuring performance at the school level, student performance shows the state must continue to stress innovation and personalized learning to ensure continued progress.

“We know that students learn best when instruction is tailored to their needs,” Johnson said, “so we’re adjusting our supports for educators at the state level to help make that happen. Teachers are working hard and our state must transform our system to complement their efforts.”

Johnson said also that he was encouraged by a decline in the number of low-performing schools and districts from the previous year.

“The fact that fewer schools and districts are underperforming is positive news in this year’s accountability report,” Johnson said. “We thank teachers and school leaders for their hard work and hope that more effective support from DPI will continue to improve those numbers.”

Low-performing schools are identified annually as those that receive a School Performance Grade of D or F and do not exceed growth. Low-performing districts are districts where the majority of schools received a School Performance Grade and have been identified as low performing. For 2017-18, 476 schools were identified as low performing, down from 505 in 2016-17, and seven districts were low performing, down from 11 in 2016-17. The number of recurring low-performing schools fell from 468 in 2016-17 to 435 in 2017-18.

School grades continue to correlate closely with the poverty levels of schools. Among schools where more than 81 percent of students come from low-income families, 69 percent of the schools received a D or F; in schools with poverty rates between 61 and 80 percent, 45 percent of the schools received a D or F. Conversely, in schools with poverty rates less than 20 percent, only 1.7 percent of schools received a D or F; schools between 21 and 40 percent poverty, 3.6 percent received a D or F. Schools with lower levels of poverty are more likely to earn As and Bs.

The school grades are based primarily on overall proficiency rates on the state’s standardized end-of-grade tests, and to a lesser extent, the growth students make during the year, irrespective of performance level. Eighty percent of the grade is for the percentage of tests earning a score considered grade-level proficient; 20 percent is for growth, measured by a statistical model that compares each student’s predicted test score, based on past performance, against his or her actual result.

In terms of growth achieved by schools this past year, 27 percent exceeded expected growth, 45.7 percent of schools met their expected performance and 27.3 percent fell short of their expected result.

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